Events in Hominoid Evolution

  • David R. Begun
  • Carol V. Ward
  • Michael D. Rose
Part of the Advances in Primatology book series (AIPR)

Abstract

The preceding chapters of this volume have described a number of different approaches and solutions to the interpretation of hominoid evolutionary history. Given the breadth of approaches, it is difficult to compare results among researchers. Despite this diversity, however, there seems to be broad agreement on many issues in the complex evolutionary history of the Hominoidea.

Keywords

Late Miocene Middle Miocene Sister Clade Early Hominid Fossil Taxon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • David R. Begun
    • 1
  • Carol V. Ward
    • 2
  • Michael D. Rose
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Anthropology and Pathology & Anatomical SciencesUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology, and Injury ScienceUniversity of MedicineUSA
  4. 4.Dentistry of New JerseyNew Jersey Medical SchoolNewarkUSA

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