Behavioral Assessment

  • Maribeth Gettinger
  • Thomas R. Kratochwill
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Interest in behavioral methods of assessment has been increasing rapidly. Although considerable attention has already been directed toward the assessment of adults, the development and the systematic evaluation of behavioral assessment procedures for children have been slower to evolve. Only in recent years have behavioral procedures been used for either the assessment and diagnosis of psychopathology in children or the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatments designed for children exhibiting behavior disorders (Mash & Terdal, 1981).

Keywords

Target Behavior Behavioral Assessment Apply Behavior Analysis Child Psychopathology Naturalistic Observation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maribeth Gettinger
    • 1
  • Thomas R. Kratochwill
    • 1
  1. 1.School Psychology Program, Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Wisconsin-MadisonMadisonUSA

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