Arboviruses

  • Robert E. Shope
  • James M. Meegan

Abstract

Arthropod-borne viruses (Arboviruses) are an ecologically defined set of viruses that have in common replication in both arthropods and vertebrate hosts and transmission between vertebrate animals by the bite of mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges.(184) The vast majority of arboviruses belong to one of five families. These are Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Bunyaviridae, Reoviridae, and Rhabdoviridae. Information on their isolation, morphology, sensitivity to inactivation by chemicals, arthropod vectors, vertebrate hosts, laboratory propagation, serological reactions, geographic distribution, clinical manifestations, and epidemiology is found in the International Catalogue of Arthropod-Borne Viruses, compiled by the American Committee on Arboviruses.(16,102) This exhaustive reference source has been used freely in preparing the text that follows.

Keywords

Yellow Fever Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Rift Valley Fever African Swine Fever Virus Yellow Fever Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert E. Shope
    • 1
  • James M. Meegan
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PathologyThe University of Texas Medical Branch at GalvestonGalvestonUSA
  2. 2.Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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