DSL and Parser Combinator

  • Vishal Layka
  • David Pollak
Chapter

Abstract

The dichotomy of generic and specific manifests itself in the programming sphere. Domain-specific languages (DSLs) are one of the forms of the manifestations of this dichotomy. Domain-specific languages are just what they are called: domain specific. All programming languages are domain-specific languages when they come into existence, but that changes as they evolve. Domain-specific languages are created to solve problems in a certain area (or more precisely, in a certain domain) but as they gradually evolve to solve problems in several domains, the line that distinguishes them as specific blurs. Thus, such a language transgresses from the specific to the generic. A DSL is a special purpose language, the other extreme of which is a general purpose language, such as Scala and Java. Unfortunately, these general purpose languages have drawbacks, for example, if you want to execute a task on a database, then it is necessary to write a computer program for executing this task using a general purpose language. However, a DSL could be used to perform a number of such tasks on a database. And this is why some experts regard SQL, the structured query language, as a DSL.

Keywords

Structure Query Language Domain Specific Language Single Language Type Safety Host Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Vishal Layka 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vishal Layka
    • 1
  • David Pollak
    • 1
  1. 1.EvereBelgium

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