Different Forms of Face-Knowledge Impairment

  • Catherine Yee-Yuen Peng
  • Ruth Campbell

Abstract

Bodamer (1947) invented the term Prosopagnosia to describe the isolated inability to recognise people by their face. Patients are usually able to judge a face to be a face, and some of them may even be able to discriminate and match face photographs normally (Benton & Van Allen, 1968). The major symptom is the failure to recognise familiar faces in real life and in reproduction (photographs, television etc.). In some cases, patients may not even recognise their own face (Bauer & Rubens, 1985). Prosopagnosic patients may be able to identify people despite this disability. They can learn to rely on paraphernalia such as clothing, gait, hair style, height and distinguishing birthmarks and on identification cues from other modalities, like voice and perfume.

Keywords

Facial Expression Face Processing Visual Imagery Superior Temporal Sulcus Double Dissociation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Argyll, J.M., Bodily Communication. London: Methuen, in press.Google Scholar
  2. Bauer, R.M. and Rubens, A.B. (1985) Agnosia. in: K.M. Heilman, and E. Valenstein, (eds.). Clinical Neuropsychology. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Baylis, G., Rolls, E.T. and Leonard, M. (1985). Selectivity between faces in the response of a population of neurons in the cortex in the superior temporal sulcus of the monkey. Brain Research, 342, 92–102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Benton, A.L. and Van Allen, M.W. (1968). Impairment in facial recognition in patients with cerebral disease. Cortex, 4, 344–358.Google Scholar
  5. Bodamer, J. (1947). Die Prosop-Agnosie (Die agnosie des Physiognomieerkennens). Archives fur Psychiatrie und Zeitschrift fur Neurologie, 179, 6–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bornstein, B. (1963). Prosopagnosia. in: L. Halpern (ed.). Problems of Dynamic Neurology Jerusalem: Haddessah Medical Organisation.Google Scholar
  7. Bruce, V. and Young, A. (1986). Understanding Face Recognition. British Journal of Psychology, 77, 305–327.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Bruyer, R., Laterre, C., Seron, X., Feyereisen, P., Strypstein, E., Pierrard, E., and Rectem, D. (1983). A case of prosopagnosia with some preserved covert recognition of familiar faces. Brain and Cognition, 2, 257–284.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Cambir, J. and Graveleau, Ph. (1985), Thalamic syndromes. in: J.A.M. Frederiks (ed.). Handbook of Clinical Neurology vol. 45, Amsterdam: Elsevier.Google Scholar
  10. Campbell, R., Landis, T. and Regard, M. (1986). Face recognition and lipreading. Brain 109, 509–521.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Cole, M. and Perez-Cruet, J. (1964). Prosopagnosia. Neuropsychologia 2, 237–246.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Corkin, S. (1984). Lasting consequences of bilateral medial temporal lobectomy: clinical course and experimental findings in HM. Seminars in Neurology 4, 249–259.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Crawford, J.R., Besson, J.A.O., Ellis, H.D., Parker, D.M., Salzen, E.A., Gemmell, H.G., Sharp, P.F., Beavan, D.J. and Smith, F.W. (1986). Facial Processing in the Dementias. in: H.D. Ellis, M.A. Jeeves, F. Newcombe and A. Young (eds.) Aspects of Face Processing. Dordrecht: Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  14. Christodoulou, G.N. (1977). The Syndrome of Capgras. British Journal of Psychiatry, 130, 556–564.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Damasio, A.R. (1985). Disorders of complex visual processing: agnosia, achromatopsia, Balint syndrome and related difficulties of orientation and construction. in: M.M. Mesulam (ed.). Principles of Behavioural Neurology. Philadelphia: F.A. Davis.Google Scholar
  16. Damasio, A.R., Eslinger, P.J., Damasio, H., Van Hoesen, G.W., and Cornell, S. (1985). Multimodal amnesic syndrome following bilateral temporal and basal forebrain damage: the case of patient DRB. Archives of Neurology, 32, 331–341.Google Scholar
  17. Damasio, A.R., Damasio, H. and Van Hoesen, G.W. (1982). Prosopagnosia: anatomical basis and behavioural mechanisms. Neurology, 32, 331–351.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Damasio, A.R. and Van Hoesen, G.W. (1983). Emotional disturbances association with focal lesions of the limbic frontal lobe. in: K.M. Heilman and P. Satz. (eds.) Neuropsychology of Human Emotion. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  19. De Haan, E.H.F., Young, A. and Newcombe, F. (1987). Face recognition without awareness. Cognitive Neuropsychology,4, 385–415.Google Scholar
  20. De Renzi, E. (1986a). Current issues on prosopagnosia. in: R. Bruyer (ed.). The Neuropsycholoqy of Face Perception and Facial Expression. Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  21. De Renzi, E. (1986b). Prosopagnosia in two patients with CT scan evidence of damage confined to the right hemisphere. Neuropsychologia, 24, 385–391.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Duncan, J. (1986). Disorganisation of behaviour after frontal lobe damage Cognitive. Neuropsychology, 3, 271–290.Google Scholar
  23. Ekman, P. and Friesen, W. (1976) Pictures of Facial Affect. California: Consulting Psychologist Press.Google Scholar
  24. Ellis, H.D. (1986). Introduction: processes underlying face recognition. in: R. Bruyer (ed.). The Neuropsychology of Face Perception and Facial Expression. Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  25. Feyereisen, P. (1986). Production and comprehension of emotional facial expressions in brain-damaged subjects. in: R. Bruyer (ed.). The Neuropsychology of Face Perception and Facial Expression. Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  26. Fodor, J. (1983). The Modularity of Mind. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  27. Hampson, S. (1985). Personality traits as cognitive categories. in: A. Angleiter, G.L.M. Van Heck and A.F. Furnham (eds.) Personality Psychology in Europe vol 2. Lisse: Swets and Zeitlinger.Google Scholar
  28. Hecaen, H. and Angelergues, R. (1962). Agnosia for faces (prosopagnosia). Archives of Neurology, 7, 92–100.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Jackson, H. and Moffat, N.J. (1987). Impaired emotional recognition following severe head injury. Cortex, 23, 293–300.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  30. Kendon, A. (1986). Current issues in the study of gesture. in: J.L. Nespoulas, P. Perron and A.R. Lecours (ads.). The Biological Foundations of Gesture: Motor and Semiotic Aspects. Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.Google Scholar
  31. Kertesz, A. (1983). Localisation in Neuropsychology. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  32. Kurucz, J. and Feldmar, G. (1979). Prosopo-affective agnosia as a symptom of cerebral organic disease. Journal of the American Geriatric Society, 27, 225–230.Google Scholar
  33. Landis, T., Cummings, J.L., Christen, L., Bogen, J.E. and Imhof, H-G. (1986). Are unilateral right posterior cerebral lesions sufficient to cause prosopagnosia? Cortex, 22, 243–252.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  34. Malone, D.R., Morris, H.M., Kay, M.C., and Levin, H.S. (1982). Prosopagnosia: a double dissociation between the recognition of familiar and unfamiliar faces. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 37, 489–501.Google Scholar
  35. Mateer, C.A. (1983). Localisation of language and visual spatial functions by electrical stimulation. in: A. Kertesz. (ed.). Localisation in Neuropsychology. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  36. Meadows, J.C. (1974). The anatomical basis of prosopagnosia. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 37, 489–450.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Milner, B. (1982). Some cognitive effects of frontal lobe lesions in man. in: D.E. Broadbent and L. Weiskrantz (eds.). The Neuropsychology of Cognitive Function. London: The Royal Society.Google Scholar
  38. Passingham, R. (1986). Unpublished lectures, University of Oxford.Google Scholar
  39. Perrett, D.I. and Rolls, E.T. (1983). Neural mechanisms underlying the visual analysis of faces. in: J-P. Ewert, R.R. Capranica, and D.J. Ingle. (eds.). Advances in Vertebrate Neuroethology. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  40. Poek, K. (1985). Temporal lobe syndromes. In J.A.M. Frederiks. (ed.). Handbook of Clinical Neurology vol 45. Amsterdam: Elsevier.Google Scholar
  41. Reber, A.S. (1985). The Penguin Dictionary of Psychology. Harmondsworth Mddx: Penguin.Google Scholar
  42. Ross, E. (1983). Right-hemisphere lesions in disorders of affective language. in: A. Kertesz (ed.). Localisation in Neuropsychology. London: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  43. Shallice, T. (1982). Specific Impairments of planning. in: D.E. Broadbent and L. Weiskrantz (eds.) The Neuropsychology of Cognitive Function. London: The Royal Society.Google Scholar
  44. Shuttleworth, E.E., Syrina, V., and Allen, N. (1982). Further Observations on the nature of prosopagnosia. Brain and Cognition, 1, 307–322.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Stuss, D.T. and Benson, D.F. (1986). The Frontal Lobes. New York: Raven Press.Google Scholar
  46. Synodinou, C., Christodoulou, G.N. and Tzavaras, A. (1978). Capgras syndrome and prosopagnosia. British Journal of Psychiatry, 132, 413–414.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Teuber, H.L. (1955). Physiological psychology. Annual Review of Psychology, 6, 267–269.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Tiberghien, G. (1986). Context effects in recognition memory of faces: some theoretical problems. in: H.D. Ellis, M.A. Jeeves, F. Newcombe and A. Young. (ads.). Aspects of Face Processing. Dordrecht: Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  49. Tiller, D. (unpublished). The Emotional Lexicon. D.Phil. thesis, University of Oxford.Google Scholar
  50. Trower, P., Argyle, J.M. and Bryant, B. (1977). Social Skills and Mental Health. London: Tavistock.Google Scholar
  51. Warrington, E.K. and James, M. (1967). An experimental investigation of facial recognition in patients with unilateral cerebral lesions. Cortex, 3, 317–326.Google Scholar
  52. Whiteley, A.M. and Warrington, E.K. (1977). Prosopagnosia: a clinical, psychological and anatomical study of three patients. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 40, 395–403.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Catherine Yee-Yuen Peng
  • Ruth Campbell

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations