Langerhans Cells in the TGFβ1 Null Mouse

  • Teresa A. Borkowski
  • John J. Letterio
  • Crystal L. Mackall
  • Atsushi Saitoh
  • Andrew G. Farr
  • Xiao-Jing Wang
  • Dennis R. Roop
  • Ronald E. Gress
  • Mark C. Udey
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 417)

Abstract

We recently identified a cell surface protein (gp40) that is homologous to human Ep­CAM, a putative homophilic adhesion molecule, and that is abundantly expressed by some murine dendritic cells (including Langerhans cells) and in certain epithelia (1). While charac­terizing various dendritic cells with regard to gp40 expression, we determined that the pleiot­ropic cytokine TGFβ;1 was uniquely able to induce cell surface expression of gp40 on dendritic cells propagated from murine bone marrow in fetal calf serum- and GM-CSF-sup­plemented media. To determine whether or not this finding was potentially physiologically significant, we studied Langerhans cells in TGFβ1 null mice that had previously been gener­ated and described by Kulkarni, Karlsson and coworkers (2).

Keywords

Dendritic Cell Null Mouse Murine Bone Marrow Gp40 Expression Epidermal Sheet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Teresa A. Borkowski
    • 1
  • John J. Letterio
    • 2
  • Crystal L. Mackall
    • 3
  • Atsushi Saitoh
    • 1
  • Andrew G. Farr
    • 4
  • Xiao-Jing Wang
    • 5
  • Dennis R. Roop
    • 5
  • Ronald E. Gress
    • 3
  • Mark C. Udey
    • 1
  1. 1.Dermatology Branch National Cancer InstituteNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of Chemoprevention National Cancer InstituteNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Experimental Immunology Branch National Cancer InstituteNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Biological StructureUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  5. 5.Department of Cell BiologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA

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