Metabolic Effects of Intranasally Administered Insulin and Glucagon in Man

  • A. E. Pontiroli
  • M. Alberetto
  • A. Calderara
  • E. Pajetta
  • G. Pozza
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 125)

Abstract

After isolation, chemical characterization and purification, several polypeptide hormones, i.e. insulin, glucagon, vasopressin and its analogues. LHRH and its derivatives. ACTH, calcitonin, growth hormone, gonadotropins, are currently employed in clinical practice. These hormones are administered parenterally, either by the subcutaneous, the intramuscular, the intravenous or the intraperitoneal route and by means of syringes or pumps. Some of these hormones require continuous or prolonged treatments in several chronic diseases, and this can cause severe reactions and may reduce the compliance of patients during the course of the disease. For these reasons, alternative routes of administration of peptidic hormones have been investigated. Oral administration has been tried for many of them but the gastrointestinal proteolytic digestion remains a limiting factor for most of them, with the noticeable exception of dDAVP (Pontiroli et al., 1985).

Keywords

Plasma Glucagon Porcine Insulin Spray Solution Potency Ratio Spray Formulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. E. Pontiroli
    • 1
  • M. Alberetto
    • 1
  • A. Calderara
    • 1
  • E. Pajetta
    • 1
  • G. Pozza
    • 1
  1. 1.Istituto Scientifico Ospedale San Raffaele, Cattedra di Clinica MedicaUniversita di MilanoMilanoItaly

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