The Historical Development of an Evolutionary Archaeology

A Selectionist Approach
  • Michael J. O’Brien
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Increasingly in the last several years there has been a growing number of archaeologists who are beginning to take note of the fact that Darwinian evolution offers a powerful means of explaining variation in the material record. The approach has been variously termed evolutionary, or selectionist, archaeology, and though it is still in a formative stage, there are clear signs of future growth and development. Although Darwinian evolutionary archaeology has not enjoyed the meteoric rise seen in the overnight sensation of the 1960s, processual archaeology, there are now in preparation or in press several edited books on the subject (e.g., Teltser 1995; O’Brien 1996), as well as numerous evolutionarily focused articles in leading archaeological journal (e.g., Dunnell 1978a, 1980; Leonard and Jones 1987; Rindos 1989; O’Brien and Holland 1990, 1992; Neff 1992; O’Brien et al 1994) and monographs (e.g., Feathers 1989; Braun 1990; Dunnell 1992, 1995; O’Brien and Holland 1995a,b).

Keywords

Evolutionary Theory Cultural Evolution Archaeological Record Darwinian Evolution Current Anthropology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. O’Brien
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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