Coping with the Prospect of Social Disapproval

Strategies and Sequelae
  • Ann H. Baumgardner
  • Robert M. Arkin
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

Samuel Clemens’s observation about the human condition is both insightful and amusing. Embarrassment is an all too familiar human emotion, and one that reveals a great deal about the nature of social relations. This chapter is not about embarrassment. Yet the fact that it exists, and can run so deep, does set the stage for the present analysis of the role of disapproval in social exchange.

Keywords

Social Anxiety Social Comparison Test Anxiety Causal Attribution Active Attempt 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann H. Baumgardner
    • 1
  • Robert M. Arkin
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Missouri-ColumbiaColumbiaUSA

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