Threats to Identity

Self-Identification and Social Stress
  • Barry R. Schlenker
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

In the physical sciences, stress is a relative concept that reflects the pressure or force on a body to deform its shape versus the strength or resistance of the body to hold its shape. When external force exceeds internal resistance, the body bends and ultimately breaks, losing its integrity. If internal resistance is greater than external force, the integrity of the entity survives.

Keywords

Social Psychology Social Anxiety Test Anxiety Outcome Expectation Attributional Style 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry R. Schlenker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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