Behavior Analysis and HIV Prevention

A Call to Action
  • Grace Baron
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Very specific behaviors and environments perpetuate the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. Thus, writes the National Commission on AIDS (1993), it is logical that behavioral and social science expertise should be fully utilized in our national and global response to the epidemic, particularly in prevention efforts. However, in sharp contrast to the energetic involvement by behavioral scientists in other health areas such as smoking, safety, and exercise, there has been relatively little activity in HIV prevention by those of us with expertise in behavior change. What are the barriers keeping us so inactive? What can we contribute? How can we accelerate our involvement? This chapter addresses these questions and invites readers to apply the logic and practice of behavioral analysis to the expanding local and global tragedy of AIDS.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Behavioral Medicine Behavior Analysis Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Grace Baron
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWheaton CollegeNortonUSA

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