Memory and Epileptogenesis in Complex Biological and Simulated Systems

  • J. C. Klopp
  • P. Johnston
  • E. Halgren
  • K. Marinkovic
  • V. I. Nenov

Abstract

Oscillations of neural activity may bind widespread cortical areas into a neural representation that encodes disparate aspects of an event. In order to test this theory we have turned to data collected from complex partial epilepsy (CPE) patients with chronically implanted depth electrodes. Data from regions critical to word and face information processing was analyzed using spectral coherence measurements. Similar analyses of intracranial EEG (iEEG) during seizure episodes display HippoCampal Formation (HCF)—NeoCortical (NC) spectral coherence patterns that are characteristic of specific seizure stages (Klopp et al. 1996). We are now building a computational memory model to examine whether spatio-temporal patterns of human iEEG spectral coherence emerge in a computer simulation of HCF cellular distribution, membrane physiology and synaptic connectivity. Once the model is reasonably scaled it will be used as a tool to explore neural parameters that are critical to memory formation and epileptogenesis.

Keywords

Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Declarative Memory Retrograde Amnesia Transient Global Amnesia Dentate Granule Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. C. Klopp
    • 1
    • 2
  • P. Johnston
    • 3
  • E. Halgren
    • 4
    • 5
  • K. Marinkovic
    • 4
    • 5
  • V. I. Nenov
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Brain Monitoring and Modeling Laboratory Div. NeurosurgeryUCLAUSA
  2. 2.Interdepartmental Neuroscience Ph.D. ProgramUCLAUSA
  3. 3.University of NorthumbriaNewcastleEngland
  4. 4.Brain Research InstituteUCLAUSA
  5. 5.INSERM U97ParisFrance

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