Stochastic Modeling of the Pyramidal Cell Module

  • Bruce H. McCormick
  • Glen T. Prusky
  • Sandeep Tewari

Abstract

The neuronal environment of the pyramidal cell module (PCM) is morphologically modeled as perhaps the most important example of a space-filling neuronal structure. PCMs are fundamental information processing units of the monkey striate cerebral cortex. The PCM is modeled as a cylinder, 1600 μm long and 31 μm in diameter, which contains approximately 142 cells, the majority of which are pyramidal cells. Granular cells, spiny stellate cells, and other inhibitory nonpyramidal cells have a minority presence. The influence of peripheral PCMs is modeled by considering a larger cylinder around the PCM in question. We assume a hexagonal packing of the PCMs inside the larger cylinder, much like rods in a chilled water nuclear reactor. A PCM has a six-layer architecture, and the number and type of cells varies from one layer to the other. The PCM is then modeled as a stack of coaxial wafers of varying thickness. The dendrite morphology of the constituent cells of the PCM, as derived from digital neuron tracing, is used to stochastically estimate distribution functions for wafer-towafer interactions. Translational and rotational invariance is invoked to simplify the functional form of the critical distribution functions.

Keywords

Rotational Invariance Apical Dendrite Neuron Morphology Hexagonal Packing Dendritic Segment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce H. McCormick
    • 1
  • Glen T. Prusky
    • 2
  • Sandeep Tewari
    • 3
  1. 1.Scientific Visualization LaboratoryTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyThe University of LethbridgeLethbridgeCanada
  3. 3.Scientific Visualization LaboratoryTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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