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Couples and Families

  • Sam Kirschner
  • Diana Adile Kirschner

Abstract

The family is a complex living organism with subsystems which include interpersonal relationships and individual emotions and cognitions all in dynamic exchange. Like Blake’s “world in a grain of sand” each subcomponent of the family dynamic provides a reflection of the others embedded within. These two primary subsystems, the interpersonal and the individual, system and psyche, can be viewed as independent entities for the purpose of analysis. Yet mounting research and clinical evidence suggest that the two entities are very interdependent and that they shape and influence each other throughout the life cycle.

Keywords

Family Therapy Couple Therapy Gender Identification Marital Interaction Progressive Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sam Kirschner
    • 1
  • Diana Adile Kirschner
    • 1
  1. 1.Private PracticeUSA

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