A Feminist Framework for Integrative Psychotherapy

  • Iris G. Fodor

Abstract

Feminism: the doctrine of advocating social and political rights for women equal to men (Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary, 1979).

Keywords

Cognitive Behavior Therapy Feminist Approach Feminist System Nontraditional Approach Assertiveness Training 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iris G. Fodor
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied PsychologyNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA

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