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The Active Self Model

A Paradigm for Psychotherapy Integration
  • John D. W. Andrews

Abstract

A theoretical model that aims at being integrative must provide a consistent account of personality stability and change; it must be anchored in a scientifically valid body of data; it must take account of other therapy models; and it must enable us to assess client problems and intervene helpfully. In what follows, I will present the active self or self-confirmation account of personality and therapy, and will indicate how this model aspires to meet the criteria indicated above.

Keywords

Behavior Therapy Cognitive Therapy Individual Approach Leverage Point Feedback Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • John D. W. Andrews
    • 1
  1. 1.Psychological and Counseling ServicesUniversity of CaliforniaSan Diego, La JollaUSA

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