Cognitive Therapy with Inpatients

  • Wayne A. Bowers

Abstract

The introduction of psychotropic medications in the 1950s and 1960s revolutionized inpatient treatment of emotional disorders, reducing the census of pyschiatric hospitals. During the late 1960s and early 1970s, the emphasis on long-term inpatient treatment changed to reflect the new philosophy of returning patients as quickly as possible to their home environment. This followed the creation of community-based treatment centers established during the Kennedy administration. The community mental health movement’s attempt to limit hospitalization was made possible by advances in chemotherapy and psychosocial treatments.

Keywords

Cognitive Therapy Inpatient Unit Automatic Thought Dysfunctional Attitude Cognitive Therapy Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wayne A. Bowers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA

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