Enhancing Cognitive Therapy with Women

  • Denise Davis
  • Christine Padesky

Abstract

In considering the array of therapeutic approaches available today, cognitive therapy offers some special advantages for women. The theory and practice of cognitive therapy appear to be especially harmonious with the feminist philosophy of advancing the rights and status of women (Farrell & Davis, 1986). Dealing with women clients does not mean that the fundamentals of cognitive therapy need to be substantially revised. However, cognitive therapists attempting to understand their clients’ idiosyncratic, internal reality may enhance this understanding by considering the context of gender. Just as it is clearly a mistake to overgeneralize research findings based only on a male sample, so it is a mistake in clinical practice to assume male and female experiences and beliefs are identical. Therapists are becoming more sophisticated in applying cognitive therapy with special populations, as demonstrated by this volume. Recognizing women as a population in cognitive therapy involves consideration of the importance of gender and a willingness to explore the ways in which a woman’s thoughts are influenced by her social realities.

Keywords

Cognitive Therapy Cognitive Distortion Cognitive Therapist Date Rape Female Client 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denise Davis
    • 1
  • Christine Padesky
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Center for Cognitive TherapyNewport BeachUSA

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