Cognitive-Behavioral Marital Therapy

  • Norman Epstein
  • Donald H. Baucom

Abstract

Cognitive-behavioral therapies were developed primarily as approaches to understanding and treating problems of individuals, such as depression (Beck, 1976; Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979), impulsive behavior (Meichenbaum, 1977; Watkins, 1977), anxiety (Beck, Emery, & Greenberg, 1985), anger (Novaco, 1975), and unassertiveness (Lange & Jakubowski, 1976). However, cognitive-behavioral principles and procedures increasingly have been extended to the treatment of problems in intimate interpersonal relationships, with a focus on modifying repetitive dysfunctional patterns of marital and family interactions.

Keywords

Marital Conflict Marital Problem Marital History Marital Distress Marital Interaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman Epstein
    • 1
  • Donald H. Baucom
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family and Community DevelopmentUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA

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