Cognitive Assessment

  • Thomas V. Merluzzi
  • Michael D. Boltwood

Abstract

The focus of this chapter is on the clinical assessment of cognition. In order to provide a conceptual framework for cognitive assessment methods, Kendall and Ingram (1987) have proposed a taxonomic system that includes four major components: (1) cognitive structure, (2) cognitive propositions, (3) cognitive operations, and (4) cognitive products (pp. 91–92). After a brief exposition of these components and a discussion of the validity of self-reports, the remaining portions of the chapter will contain a review of prevalent methods and present examples of cognitive assessment.

Keywords

Cognitive Therapy Cognitive Assessment Irrational Belief Attributional Style Automatic Thought 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas V. Merluzzi
    • 1
  • Michael D. Boltwood
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Notre DameNotre DameUSA
  2. 2.Counseling Psychology Program, School of EducationStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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