Panic with Agoraphobia

  • Frank M. Dattilio
  • Robert J. Berchick

Abstract

Carole had just turned 33 years old as she rounded off her 9th year of marriage to Ross. There had been an ongoing discussion between the two of them during the past year about whether or not to have a fourth child. This issue created some tension for Carole; she remained the undecided one. She put further discussion off with the excuse of waiting until after the Christmas holidays to make a decision. They had been in their new home for less than one year, and with all of the commotion, Carole had neglected to start her Christmas shopping—another burden on her mind. The combination of these events made for a very stressful period in her life, rendering her vulnerable to overload.

Keywords

Generalize Anxiety Disorder Panic Disorder Cognitive Therapy Panic Attack Homework Assignment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alford, B.A., Beck, A.T., Freeman, A., & Wright, E (1990). Brief focused cognitive therapy of panic disorder. Psychotherapy, 27, 230–234.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. American Psychiatric Association (1987). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (rev. 3rd ed.). Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  3. Beck, A.T., Emery, G., & Greenberg, P L. (1985). Anxiety disorders and phobias: A cognitive perspective. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  4. Clark, D.M., Salkovskis, P M., & Chalkley, A.J. (1985). Respiratory control as a treatment for panic attacks. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 16, 23–30.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Clum, G.A. (1990). Coping with panic: A drug-free approach to dealing with anxiety attacks. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.Google Scholar
  6. Dattilio, E M. (1987). The use of paradoxical intention in the treatment of panic attacks. Journal of Counseling and Development, 66, 66–67.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Dattilio, E M. (1990). Symptom induction and de-escalation in the treatment of panic attacks. Journal of Mental Health Counseling, 12, 515–519.Google Scholar
  8. Foa, E.B., & Foa, U.G. (1982). Differentiating depression and anxiety: Is it possible? Is it useful? Psychopharmacology Bulletin, 18, 62–68.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Jacobson, E. (1962). You must relax. New York, McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  10. Solkol, L., Beck, A.T., Greenberg, R.L., Wright, E D., & Berchick, R.J. (1989). Cognitive therapy of panic disorder: A non-pharmacological alternative. Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease, 177, 711–716.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Wardel, J. (1990). Behavior therapy and benzodiazepines: allies or antagonists? British Journal of Psychiatry, 156, 163–168.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Wolpe, J. (1973). The practice of behavior therapy. New York: Pergamon.Google Scholar

Suggested Readings

  1. Beck, A.T., Emery, G., & Greenberg, P L. (1985). Anxiety disorders and phobias: A cognitive perspective. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  2. Barlow, D.H. (1988). Anxiety and its Disorders. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  3. Clum, G.A. (1990). Coping with panic: A drug-free approach to dealing with anxiety attacks. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.Google Scholar
  4. Goldstein, A.J., & Chabless, D.L. (1978). A reanalysis of agoraphobia. Behavioral Therapy, 9, 47–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Tuma, A.H., & Maser, J.D. (Eds.). Anxiety & the anxiety disorders. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank M. Dattilio
    • 1
  • Robert J. Berchick
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Cognitive Therapy, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

Personalised recommendations