Inpatient Treatment

  • Mary Helen Davis
  • G. Randolph SchrodtJr.

Abstract

The practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in an inpatient setting involves the expansion of the traditional individual psychotherapy format to a multidisciplinary team (Bowers, 1989, Davis & Casey, 1990; Shaw, 1981). Inpatients frequently present with severe, complex conditions that may require family, group, and pharmacologic interventions in addition to individual cognitive behavior therapy. An integrated cognitive-behavioral milieu can provide expanded opportunities for a patient to incorporate the principles of change that are learned in individual therapy sessions. The CBT emphasis on collaborative problem solving can also provide a cohesive organizing philosophy for the treatment staff (Schrodt & Wright, 1987).

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Personality Disorder Cognitive Therapy Inpatient Treatment Inpatient Setting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

  1. Beck, A. T., & Freeman, A. (1990). Cognitive therapy of personality disorders. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Helen Davis
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Randolph SchrodtJr.
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Louisville School of MedicineLouisvilleUSA
  2. 2.Norton Psychiatric ClinicLouisvilleUSA

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