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The Patient with Multiple Problems

  • Jacqueline B. Persons

Abstract

The case presented here illustrates two points. First, although the controlled outcome studies of cognitive therapy for depression (e.g., Rush, Beck, Kovacs, & Hollon, 1977) focus solely on depressive symptoms, depressed patients typically have many problems. This patient had several, and treatment addressed them all. Second, the case formulation—the therapist’s hypothesis about the patient’s central dysfunctional attitudes—helped the therapist focus the treatment on central issues, no matter what problem was being worked on.

Keywords

Beck Depression Inventory Cognitive Therapy Case Formulation Automatic Thought Dysfunctional Attitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B. E, & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  2. Burns, D. D. (1980). Feeling good: The new mood therapy. New York: William Morrow.Google Scholar
  3. Lewinsohn, P M., Hoberman, T., Teri, L., & Hautzinger, M. (1985). An integrative theory of depression. In S. Reiss & R. Bootzin (Eds.), Theoretical issues in behavior therapy. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  4. Persons, J. B. (1989). Cognitive therapy in practice: A case formulation approach. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  5. Rush, A. J., Beck, A. T., Kovacs, M., & Hollon, S. (1977). Comparative efficacy of cognitive therapy and pharmacotherapy in the treatment of depression outpatients. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 1, 17–38.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Young, J. (1990). Cognitive therapy for personality disorders: A schema-focused approach. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Exchange.Google Scholar

Suggested Readings

  1. Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B. F., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  2. Burns, D. D. (1980). Feeling good: The new mood therapy. New York: William Morrow.Google Scholar
  3. Persons, J. B. (1989). Cognitive therapy in practice: A case formulation approach. New York: Norton.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jacqueline B. Persons
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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