The Schizophrenic Patient

  • Bruce N. Eimer
  • Arthur Freeman

Abstract

Community mental health centers, university-based counseling centers, church-supported or governmental social service agencies, or psychiatric residency program sites are often the main training ground for therapists and counselors. These settings are often most needy of practicum students and interns to provide the services to the agency’s clientele. These agencies are also the direct service providers for some of the most chronic and emotionally disturbed patients. The system provides several paradoxes: The most chronic, needy, and disturbed patients may get the least experienced therapists. The patients who are in need of long-term contact and a strong, ongoing therapeutic relationship are often limited to one year of treatment by an intern or trainee. There is, of course, the option of beginning again the next training cycle with a new therapist. This pattern, however, is becoming part of the more general service provision of psychotherapy as third-party payers and managed health care systems place limits on the number of sessions that consumers may have for therapy.

Keywords

Social Anxiety Schizophrenic Patient Cognitive Therapy Community Mental Health Center Borderline Personality Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Suggested Readings

  1. Arieti, S. (1974). Interpretation of schizophrenia. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  2. Bellack, L., Hurvich, M., & Gediman, H. (1973). Ego functions in schizophrenics, neurotics, and normals. New York: John Wiley.Google Scholar
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  6. Stone, M. H., Albert, H. D., Forrest, D. V., & Arieti, S. (1983). Treating schizophrenia patients: A clinico-analytical approach. New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bruce N. Eimer
    • 1
  • Arthur Freeman
    • 2
  1. 1.The Behavior Therapy CenterJenkintownUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryCooper Hospital/University Medical Center and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School at CamdenCamdenUSA

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