Borderline Personality Disorder

  • Ralph M. Turner

Abstract

Historically, persons diagnosed as borderline personality disordered (BPD) have been considered difficult, if not impossible, to work with for therapists of all theoretical orientations. This classification of patients actually was derived from the notion that there exists a psycho-pathological disorder having features common to both psychotic disorders and what used to be called the neurotic disorders (the anxiety disorders and some types of depression).

Keywords

Borderline Personality Disorder Personality Disorder Dialectical Behavior Therapy Borderline Personality Disorder Cognitive Distortion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Suggested Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ralph M. Turner
    • 1
  1. 1.Adolescents and Families Treatment Research Center, Department of PsychiatryTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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