Bulimia Nervosa

  • David M. Garner

Overview

In recent years there has been extraordinary interest in cognitive therapy for eating disorders. Treatment reviews in this area indicate that cognitive therapy has been the subject of the majority of empirical evaluations, with results indicating that it is particularly effective for bulimia nervosa (see Garner, Fairburn, & Davis, 1987). At this stage, support for its use with anorexia nervosa rests largely on clinical evidence, since no controlled trials of efficacy have been published. The reason for this probably relates to the fact that the treatment of anorexia nervosa is usually a complicated and lengthy process involving the need for weight restoration as well as the integration of inpatient and outpatient phases of care.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorder Binge Eating Bulimia Nervosa Cognitive Therapy 
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References

  1. Garner, D. M. (1986). Cognitive therapy for bulimia nervosa. Annals of Adolescent Psychiatry, 13, 358–390.Google Scholar
  2. Garner, D. M. (1991). Eating Disorder Inventory-2 professional manual. Odessa, FL: Psychological Assessment Resources.Google Scholar
  3. Garner, D. M., & Bemis, K. M. (1982). A cognitive-behavioral approach to anorexia nervosa. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 6, 123–150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Garner, D. M., & Bemis, K. M. (1985). Cognitive therapy for anorexia nervosa. In D. M. Garner & P E. Garfinkel (Eds.), Handbook of psychotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia, (pp. 107–146). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  5. Garner, D. M., Fairburn, C. G., & Davis, R. (1987). Cognitive-behavioral treatment of bulimia nervosa: A critical appraisal. Behavior Modification, 11, 398–431.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Garner, D. M., & Parker, P. (1993). Multimodal assessment of eating disorders. In T. H. Ollendick & M. Hersen (Eds.), Handbook of child and adolescent assessment. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.Google Scholar
  7. Garner, D. M., Rockert, W., Olmsted, M. P., Johnson, C. L., & Coscina, D. V. (1985). Psychoeducational principles in the treatment of bulimia and anorexia nervosa. In D. M. Garner & P. E. Garfinkel (Eds.), Handbook of psychotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia, (pp. 513-572). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  8. Garner, D. M., & Rosen, L. W. (1990). Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. In A. S. Bellack, M. Hersen, & A. E. Kazdin (Eds.), International handbook of behavior modification and therapy (2nd ed., pp. 805–817). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Garner, D. M., & Wooley, S. C. (1991). Confronting the failure of behavioral and dietary treatments for obesity. Clinical Psychology Review, 11, 729–780.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Suggested Readings

  1. Fairburn, C. G. (1985). Cognitive-behavioral treatment for bulimia. In D. M. Garner & P. E. Garfinkel (Eds.), Handbook of psychotherapy for anorexia nervosa and bulimia (pp. 160–192). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  2. Garner, D. M. (1988). Anorexia nervosa. In M. Hersen & C. G. Last (Eds.), Child behavior therapy casebook (pp. 263–276). New York: Plenum.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Garner, D. M., Rockert, W., Davis, R., Garner, M. V., Olmsted, M. P., & Eagle, M. (in press). A comparison between cognitive-behavioral and supportive-expressive therapy for bulimia nervosa. American Journal of Psychiatry.Google Scholar
  4. Garner, D. M., Garfinkel, P. E., and Irvine, M. J. (1986). Integration and sequencing of treatment approaches for eating disorders. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 46, 67–75.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Garner, D. M., (1992). Psychotherapy for eating disorders. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 5, 391–395.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Garner
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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