Articulation Disorders

Psychological Factors
  • A. C. Nichols

Abstract

While organic factors underlying articulation problems have been confirmed as etiologically significant (see Nichols’ earlier Chapter 1), perception, learning and social—emotional factors have long been known to affect articulatory disintegration and to be important in therapy. Important theoretical studies have been designed to study the developmental learning aspects of phonological competence. Many studies have dealt with the discrimination of speech sounds among speakers with articulation problems, and some have dealt with the contributions of social and emotional factors to such disorders. As required in science, the theoretical canon dealing with articulation disorders has been demonstrated to have descriptive (diagnostic) power and predictive (therapeutic) power. The present chapter will treat these psychological topics with comments on their powers of description and prediction.

Keywords

Speech Sound Dichotic Listening Articulation Problem Speech Pathology Hearing Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. C. Nichols
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Speech PathologySan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA

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