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Rational-Emotive Therapy in Groups

  • Richard L. Wessler

Abstract

Rational-emotive therapy (RET) as group psychotherapy began almost as early as individual RET. In 1955, Albert Ellis, who had been trained as a psychoanalyst and who already was well known as a sex and marriage counselor, became dissatisfied with the results he obtained from employing psychoanalytic principles. Therefore, he (Ellis, 1962) took the bold step of directly confronting patients with their self-defeating philosophies, of actively arguing against their ideas, and of assigning behavioral and cognitive homework for them to practice their newly adopted ways of thinking and acting.

Keywords

Belief System Irrational Belief Irrational Thinking Evaluative Belief Evaluative Thinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard L. Wessler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyPace UniversityPleasantvilleUSA

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