Cognitive Therapy for Depression in a Group Format

  • Steven D. Hollon
  • Mark D. Evans

Abstract

Can depressed patients be treated with cognitive therapy in a group format? We think that they can. Cognitive therapy, the systematic attempt to identify and alter dysfunctional, depressogenic cognitions, appears to be a powerful intervention for depressed clients. A group treatment format allows the clinician to treat more people in the same amount of therapy time. In addition, a group format may offer certain advantages not available in an individual treatment context.

Keywords

Depressed Patient Cognitive Therapy Negative Thought Automatic Thought Depressed Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven D. Hollon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mark D. Evans
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatrySt. Paul—Ramsey Medical CenterSt. PaulUSA

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