Integrating Cognitive and Behavioral Procedures for the Treatment of Socially Isolated Children

  • Philip C. Kendall
  • Patricia Morison
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Social development in children remains a topic of interest to developmental psychologists, with a large literature devoted to understanding the ways in which adults influence and shape children’s social behavior, both prosocial and aggressive. In recent years, however, there has been increased recognition of the importance of peer interaction in the process of a child’s development (Hartup, 1979a; Lewis & Rosenblum, 1975). Experience with peers is seen as a necessary part of childhood socialization, providing an arena for sex-role learning, moral and cognitive development, mastery of aggressive impulses, and the achievement of general social competence (Hartup, 1976, 1979b). Similarly, much of the attention of mental health professionals concerned with childhood maladjustment has in the past focused on personality characteristics of the children, specific observable child behaviors, and relationships among the child’s family members. However, there is a growing body of research suggesting that poor peer relations are a powerful predictor of adult maladjustment (Cowen, Pederson, Babigian, Izzo, & Trost, 1973; Kohlberg, LaCrosse, & Ricks, 1972; Roff, 1961; Roff, Sells, & Golden, 1972).

Keywords

Social Skill Target Child Symbolic Modeling Cognitive Error Modeling Film 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Philip C. Kendall
    • 1
  • Patricia Morison
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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