Psychoactive Substance Use Disorders

  • James Langenbucher
  • Peter E. Nathan
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Although recent years have witnessed markedly increased public attention throughout the world to the human and societal costs of substance abuse, there has never been a time, even in the most ancient of days, when the use and abuse of intoxicants was not a matter of concern, attention, and dismay (Keller, 1985). In widely separated centuries and diverse geographic loci, Chinese revelers were cautioned about the dangers of rice liquor by Confucius and Lao-Tse; Alexander and his Macedonians were warned of the risks posed by their wine by Plutarch and Herodotus (unsuccessfully, in Alexander’s case: Celebrating his conquest of Babylon in 323 b.c., he died of acute alcohol poisoning at the age of 32!); the Romans were enjoined from heavy drinking by both Seneca and the Elder and Younger Plinys; and Daniel, Aaron, Samson, and the Rechabites were cautioned about the perils of immoderation by the God of the Old Testament (Dorchester, 1884).

Keywords

Alcohol Abuse Alcoholic Beverage Psychoactive Substance Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Social Learning Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Langenbucher
    • 1
  • Peter E. Nathan
    • 2
  1. 1.Center of Alcohol StudiesRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA
  2. 2.University of IowaIowa CityUSA

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