Psychodynamic Psychotherapy

  • Thomas E. Schacht
  • Hans H. Strupp
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

For some, the history of psychodynamic psychotherapy properly begins with Freud in the late nineteenth century. But, as Gedo and Wolf (1976) aptly state:

... the prevailing intellectual climate of each era is determined by the major developments in philosophy within the age that preceded it. [While] it has been fashionable among psychoanalysts to look upon Freud’s discipline as something sui generis, created from the void... [it is clear that Freud] did not regard psychoanalysis as an intellectual discipline without antecedents. (pp. 12-13)

Keywords

Basic Book Mental Event Scientific Revolution Personality Theory Psychodynamic Psychotherapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas E. Schacht
    • 1
  • Hans H. Strupp
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryJames H. Quillen College of MedicineJohnson CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA

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