Archaeomagnetic Dating

  • Robert S. Sternberg
Part of the Advances in Archaeological and Museum Science book series (AAMS, volume 2)

Abstract

Archaeomagnetic dating is based on the comparison of directions, intensities or polarities with master records of change. Archaeomagnetic direction and archaeointensity dating are regional pattern-matching techniques, whereas magnetic reversal dating is a global pattern-matching method. Secular variation dating using archaeomagnetic directions and archaeointensities has been used for Neolithic and younger cultures. Directional dating can sometimes be as good as ±25 years. Magnetic reversal stratigraphy has been useful in dating hominid sites for paleoanthropologists, with precisions of about ±0.01 Ma, or 10 ka. Besides reviewing the basic principles of these methods, this article describes a number of applications, emphasizing explication of the method and solution of particular archaeological problems.

Keywords

Secular Variation Natural Remanent Magnetization Planetary Interior Virtual Geomagnetic Pole Paleomagnetic Direction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert S. Sternberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of GeosciencesFranklin and Marshall CollegeLancasterUSA

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