Metal-Ion Selectivity of Phosphoric Acid Resin in Aqueous Nitric Acid Media

  • Akinori Jyo
  • Xiaoping Zhu
Part of the Environmental Science Research book series (ESRH, volume 55)

Abstract

Metal ion selectivity of a phosphoric acid resin (RGP), which was derived from addition of phosphoric acid to epoxy groups of macroreticular poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-divinylbenzene), was studied by measuring pH dependency of distribution ratios of various metal ions between RGP and nitric acid solutions. In nitric acid media, RGP exhibits extremely high adsorption ability toward Ti(IV), Mo(VI), and Fe(III). Furthermore, its selectivity sequence for common trivalent and divalent metal ions was quite different from that of conventional cation exchange resins having sulfonic acid groups, suggesting that RGP will be useful for the elimination of some heavy metal ions which are not strongly adsorbed by sulfonic acid resins.

Keywords

Nitric Acid Solution Acid Resin Nitric Acid Medium Aqueous Nitric Acid Phosphoric Acid Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akinori Jyo
    • 1
  • Xiaoping Zhu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry Faculty of EngineeringKumamoto UniversityKumamoto 860Japan

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