“Fragrance on the Desert Air”: The Semiochemistry of the Muskox

  • Peter F. Flood

Abstract

Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) are the largest herbivores of the high Arctic and their range extends from the northern coasts of Greenland and Ellesmere Island (83°N). the most ncrtherly land area in the world, to as far south as the Thelon Game Sanctuary (64°N) (Lent. 1988). They are normally inhabitants of the open tundra though there are records of muskoxen being found south of the tree line (Barr, 1991) and the Pleistocene muskoxen of Europe apparently occupied forested and steppe environments as well as the glacial margins (Crégut-Bonnoure. 1984). The genus Ovibos probably first appeared about one million years ago in the Middle Pleistocene of central Asia though the evidence for this not particularly secure (Crégut-Bonnoure, 1984).

Keywords

Hair Follicle Sweat Gland Sebaceous Gland Dominant Male Seward Peninsula 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter F. Flood
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Western College of Veterinary MedicineUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoon, SaskatchewanCanada

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