Essential Involvement of Mossy Fibers in Projecting the CS to the Cerebellum during Classical Conditioning

  • Joseph E. Steinmetz
  • Christine G. Logan
  • Richard F. Thompson

Abstract

A number of lesion and recording studies provide evidence that the cerebellum is essentially involved in classical conditioning of skeletal muscle responses (e.g., McCormick et al., 1982a; McCormick and Thompson, 1984). In an attempt to delineate the essential neural circuitry involved in classical eyelid conditioning, we have adopted the following working hypothesis: (1) Information concerning the occurrence of the conditioned stimulus (CS) is projected to the cerebellum along mossy fibers that originate in the pontine nuclei. (2) Information concerning occurrence of the unconditioned stimulus (US) is projected to the cerebellum along climbing fibers that originate in the inferior olive. (3) Neural plasticity associated with acquisition and retention of the classically conditioned response occurs in regions of the cerebellum where CS mossy fibers and US climbing fibers converge.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Unconditioned Stimulus Classical Conditioning Mossy Fiber Inferior Olive 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph E. Steinmetz
    • 1
  • Christine G. Logan
    • 2
  • Richard F. Thompson
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

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