Insomnia

Psychotherapy or Not?
  • Vincent P. ZarconeJr.
Part of the Critical Issues in Psychiatry book series (CIPS)

Abstract

As can be seen from the above quotation, psychotherapy can be learned by giving the right tips, just as a craft is learned. The practitioner develops a knack for understanding people and the interventions necessary to persuade them to alter their thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Probably, referral for psychotherapy is also a craft, for which it takes great experience to develop expertise.

Keywords

Sleep Disorder Verbal Intelligence American Sleep Disorder Association Insomnia Complaint Dynamic Psychotherapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Recommended Readings

  1. Greenson, R. R. (1967). The technique and practice of psychoanalysis. New York: International Universities Press. This book provides a theoretical introduction to psychodynamic psychotherapy that is classic in its clarity and elegance. It has richly detailed examples of interpretation, confrontation, clarification, and working through.Google Scholar
  2. Minuchin, S. (1974). Families and family therapy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. This book proceeds from the systems theory base of family therapy. It details boundaries in normal and troubled families.Google Scholar
  3. Strupp, H. H., Bender, J. L. (1984). Psychotherapy in a new key. New York: Basic Books. Based on the systematic study of a new technique, this book suggests a framework for much needed clinical research.Google Scholar
  4. Yalom, I. D. (1970). The theory and practice of group psychotherapy. New York: Basic Books. Probably the most widely read and cited text on the subject, this book is based on objective and subjective data gathered in hundreds of hours of group psychotherapy. It describes curative factors and continues to serve as a benchmark for evaluation of group process.Google Scholar

References

  1. Crawford, M. H. (1989). Briefings. Science 245, 934.Google Scholar
  2. Greenson, R. R. (1967). The technique and practice of psychoanalysis. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  3. Kales, A., Kales, J. D. (1984). Psychotherapy and behavior therapy. The evaluation and treatment of insomnia. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Miller, I. W, Norman, W. H., Keitner, G. I. (1989). Cognitive—behavioral treatment of depressed inpatients: Six-and twelve-month follow-up. American Journal of Psychiatry, 146, 1274–1279.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Minuchin, S. (1974). Families and family therapy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Perls, E, Hefferline, R. E, and Goodman, P. (1951). Gestalt therapy. New York: Crown Publishers/Bantam Books.Google Scholar
  7. Strupp, H. H., Bender, J. L. (1984). Psychotherapy in a new key. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  8. Wittgenstein, L. (1953). Philosophical investigations (3rd ed.) New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  9. Yalom, I. D. (1970). The theory and practice of group psychotherapy. New York, London: Basic Books.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincent P. ZarconeJr.
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Palo Alto VA Medical CenterPalo AltoUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryStanford University, School of MedicineStanfordUSA

Personalised recommendations