The Biopsychosocial Way as a Clinical Mode for Handling Critical Disease Problems in Tropical West Africa

  • Emmanuel Eyo Ekanem

Abstract

Cancer, stress, and death, as well as a broad range of health-impairing diseases, occur in Africa as elsewhere. Health has constituted for us, as it has for others, a fundamental sociocultural concern in our societies. For Africans, as for Europeans, “Man is not made up of disjointed anatomicities each functioning independently and subject to independent variation. The whole man is made up of the bios—Man and his external environment—and the inner (psychospiritual), man or logos.” (1) In Africa, as in all countries and continents, “good health entails a sound balance between these two. . . .” (2)

Keywords

Health Care Delivery System Environmental Sanitation Critical Disease Life Event Change Rural Development Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Day, S.B., 1982, Life Stress, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, pp. ix–xiii.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Day, S.B., Yunis, E.J., and Dubey, D., 1981, An overview of stress and the immune system, in: Social Pediatrics, International Foundation, New York, pp. 69–81.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Day, S.B., 1982, Position Paper No. 3, On the Matter of Training for Family Medicine and the Object of Integrating This Prospect within the Domain of Primary Health Care. University of Calabar, College of Medical Sciences, Calabar, Nigeria.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Day, S.B., 1983, Man in Search of Health, WHO Public Lecture, inaugurated by the University of Calabar in association with the Federal Ministry of Health, Nigeria.Google Scholar

Selected Readings in Biopsychosocial Health

  1. 5.
    Ekanem, E.E., 1983, Palmol Nigeria, Prize Dissertation Department of Community Health, University of Calabar, Biopsychosocial Health—The Cross River State Experience.Google Scholar
  2. 6.
    Ekanem, G.P., 1982, Problems and prospects encountered in setting up the Community Health Clinical Clerkship at the University of Calabar College of Medicine, with an account of case reports in the field of primary health care at Akampka: A Report in Biopsychosocial Medicine, Calabar.Google Scholar
  3. 7.
    Adindu, S.C., 1983, The Socio-Economic Factors That Affect the Utilisation of Modern Medical Services in Rural Communities: A Case Study of Nvosi Community in Isiala Ngwalga, Imo State, Nigeria, University of Calabar.Google Scholar
  4. 8.
    Neji, A.A., 1982, Childhood Infectious Diseases (A Case Study of Akampka Villages): A Report in Biopsychosocial Medicine, University of Calabar.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emmanuel Eyo Ekanem
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University of Calabar Teaching HospitalCalabar, Cross River StateNigeria
  2. 2.Department of Community Health, College of Medical SciencesUniversity of CalabarCross River StateNigeria

Personalised recommendations