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Effectiveness of Borocaptate Sodium for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in Malignant Brain Tumors

A Study of Its Quantitative Distribution in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Patients
  • Masao Takagaki
  • Yoshifumi Oda
  • Yasushi Koda
  • Haruhiko Kikuchi
  • Koji Ono

Abstract

Since 1990, we have treated fourteen glioblastoma patients by BNCT using BSH according to Hatanaka’s procedures. However, in our early patients, who were almost all advanced cases, good clinical results were not obtained, probably because the tumor to blood ratio of 10B concentration in our BNCT subjects was always under 1 and/or around lOppm, respectively, considerably lower than the expected values. In our recent subjects, assuming the T/B ratio to be 1.0, the 10B concentration in blood was maintained at around 30ppm during BNCT to achieve a 10B concentration in the tumor of 28ppm, the theoretically required minimum concentration. This strategy improved the post-BNCT course in glioblastoma patients. In both glioblastoma patients and brain tumor animals models, the T/B ratio of BSH has been reported to show wide variations (l, 2, 3). To estimate the optimal dosage of BSH, we have previously investigated the quantitative distribution of BSH in tumors and blood in newly diagnosed subjects and in brain tumor-bearing animals. In this study, we investigated the quantitative distribution of BSH via prompt gamma ray spectroscopy (PGS) and an α-track etch method (ATM) in newly diagnosed human glioblastoma patients and its effectiveness was discussed for the clinical purpose.

Keywords

Tumor Vessel Malignant Brain Tumor Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Glioblastoma Patient Track Density 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Masao Takagaki
    • 1
  • Yoshifumi Oda
    • 1
  • Yasushi Koda
    • 1
  • Haruhiko Kikuchi
    • 1
  • Koji Ono
    • 1
  1. 1.Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory Research Reactor Institute Department of Neurosurgery Faculty of MedicineKyoto UniversityOsakaJapan

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