Subcellular Localization of a Boronated Nucleoside Using Ion Microscopy

  • Isabelle Gay
  • Raymond F. Schinazi
  • Dennis C. Liotta
  • George H. Morrison

Abstract

The success of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is dependent on the uptake and retention of a sufficient quantity of boron by tumor cells. It has been calculated that the concentration of 10B delivered to the tumor must be in the range of 5–30 μg/g 1. As more boronated compounds are developed for possible use in BNCT, it becomes increasingly more important to have quick effective techniques for screening the compounds in cell culture and animal models. It is vital to know how much boron is taken up by tumor cells, how much of the boron is retained by the cells, and where the boron is localized within the cells before a decision can be made about using a compound for clinical trials. Ion microscopy is a very powerful technique which can be used for evaluating the uptake, localization, selectivity, and retention of boron in cell cultures and animal models.

Keywords

Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Tumor Mast Cell Boron Uptake U251 Human Glioma Cell Polished Silicon Wafer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    R. G. Zamenhof, A. M. Kalend and W. D. Bloomer, Looking for a few good molecules, J. Natl. Cancer Inst., 84: 1290–1291, 1992.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    G. H. Morrison and G. Slodzian, Ion microscopy, Anal. Chem., 47: 932A - 943A, 1975.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    S. Chandra, C. Fewtrell, P. J. Millard, D. R. Sandison, W. W. Webb and G. H. Morrison, Imaging of total intracellular calcium and calcium influx and efflux in individual resting and stimulated tumor mast cell using ion microscopy, J. Biol. Chem., 269: 15186–15194, 1994.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    N. M. Goudgaon, G. F. El-Kattan and R. F. Schinazi, Boron containing pyrimidines, nucleosides, and oligonucleotides for neutron capture therapy, Nucleosides and Nucleotides, 13: 849–880, 1994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    S. Chandra, G. H. Morrison and C. C. Wolcott, Imaging intracellular elemental distribution and ion fluxes in cultured cells using ion microscopy: a freeze-fracture methodology, J. Microsc., 144: 15–37, 1986.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    R. F. Schinazi, N. M. Goudgaon, G. Fulcrand, Y. E. Kattan, Z. Lesnikowski, G. Ullas, J. Moravek and D. C. Liotta, Cellular pharmacology and biological activity of 5-carboranyl-2’-deoxyuridine, Int. J. Radiation Oncology Biol. Phys., 28: 1113–1120, 1994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Y. Yamamoto, T. Seko, H. Nakamura and H. Nemeto, Synthesis of carboranes containing nucleoside bases., Heteroatom Chem., 3: 239–244, 1992.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    W. A. Ausserer, Y. C. Ling, S. Chandra and G. H. Morrison, Quantitative imaging of boron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium distributions in cultured cells with ion microscopy, Anal. Chem., 61: 2690–2695, 1989.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isabelle Gay
    • 1
  • Raymond F. Schinazi
    • 2
  • Dennis C. Liotta
    • 2
  • George H. Morrison
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryCornell UniversityIthacaUSA
  2. 2.Veterans Affairs Medical CenterEmory UniversityDecaturUSA

Personalised recommendations