First Boron MRI of a Human Patient with a Brain Tumor

  • Kenneth M. Bradshaw
  • J. Rock Hadley
  • Martin P. Schweizer
  • M. Peter Heilbrun
  • Wayne L. Davis
  • Gary H. Glover

Abstract

Major challenges in the successful administration of BNCT include the development of the BNCT compound used to deliver 10B preferentially to the tumor cells and the analysis of the compound. To obtain treatment parameters this analysis must accurately reveal the distribution and concentration of the boron compound. This analysis can either be invasive or noninvasive. However, with invasive analysis we take the risk of disturbing the biological environment to the extent that the data will be biased. When performing invasive pharmacokinetic studies of a boron compound candidate, we also have the disadvantage that data sampling is often limited to one sample per animal or human experiment requiring multiple experiments per time point in order to have a statistically meaningful data set. We have introduced a method in which patient treatment parameters may be determined noninvasively. Furthermore, nonivasive data acquisition per experiment can be maximized for potential boron compound pharmacokinetic studies.

Keywords

Inductively Couple Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Glioblastoma Multiforme Inductively Couple Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy Magnetic Resonance Imaging System Boron Compound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kenneth M. Bradshaw
    • 1
    • 2
    • 8
  • J. Rock Hadley
    • 1
    • 2
    • 8
  • Martin P. Schweizer
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • M. Peter Heilbrun
    • 5
  • Wayne L. Davis
    • 6
  • Gary H. Glover
    • 7
  1. 1.Departments of RadiologyUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.Electrical EngineeringUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  3. 3.BioengineeringUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  4. 4.Medicinal ChemistryUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  5. 5.NeurosurgeryUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  6. 6.Department of RadiologyLDS HospitalSalt Lake CityUSA
  7. 7.Department of RadiologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  8. 8.Neutron TechnologyBoiseUSA

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