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Antibiotic Susceptibility of Campylobacter Isolates from Sewage and Poultry Abattoir Drain Water

  • P. M. F. J. Koenraad
  • W. F. Jacobs-Reitsma
  • T. Van Der Laan
  • R. R. Beumer
  • F. M. Rombouts

Abstract

Four sources appear to account for nearly all cases of campylobacteriosis: poultry meat products, raw milk, untreated surface water, and pets. Most cases of campylobacteriosis are single cases and related to the consumption of (undercooked) poultry meat. However, outbreaks are mostly related to consumption of raw milk or untreated surface water1,6. Most of the Campylobacter infections are self limiting, but in some severe cases, treatment with antimicrobial agents is indicated. Erythromycin is still the drug of choice8 but nowadays fluoroquinolones are considered to be a good, safe but expensive alternative for the treatment of human Campylobacter enteritis4. However, the observed increase of quinolone (cross-)resistance of Campylobacter strains isolated from human stools, poultry and poultry products may have implications for the treatment of human diarrhoeal diseases.

Keywords

Activate Sludge Nalidixic Acid Disk Diffusion Method Poultry Meat Activate Sludge Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. M. F. J. Koenraad
    • 1
  • W. F. Jacobs-Reitsma
    • 2
  • T. Van Der Laan
    • 1
  • R. R. Beumer
    • 1
  • F. M. Rombouts
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Food ScienceWageningen Agricultural UniversityWageningenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.ID-DLO Institute for Animal Science and HealthLelystadThe Netherlands

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