Detection of Antigenic Cross-Reactivity Between Helicobacter Pylori and other Bacteria by Inhibition Elisa

  • Mahrukh Kerawala
  • Shaheen Mehtar
  • Yasmin Drabu
  • Jane Ambler

Abstract

Helicobacter pylori is firmly established as a major cause of gastritis and peptic ulcer.8 Traditional methods of diagnosis rely on the detection of organisms from antral biopsy by histology, culture or rapid urease test. Non-invasive methods include radio-labelled urea breath tests and serology. Raised IgG response is ubiquitous in H. pylori infected individuals3 and serves as a good diagnostic tool. Enzyme-linked immurosorbent assay (ELISA) is an accurate, cost-effective, rapid and simple method of screening large numbers of sera for epidemiological investigation. In this study, an in-house ELISA was developed which employed ultra-centrifuged sonicated antigen (rich in urease), and the results were compared with biopsy findings. Further, we evaluated the quality of this ELISA by performing inhibition ELISA with Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella species, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis and H. pylori.

Keywords

Rapid Urease Test Inhibition ELISA Good Diagnostic Tool Heterologous Antigen Antral Biopsy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mahrukh Kerawala
    • 1
  • Shaheen Mehtar
    • 1
  • Yasmin Drabu
    • 1
  • Jane Ambler
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyNorth Middlesex HospitalLondonUK

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