Magnetic Stimulation of the Heart and Safety Issues in Magnetic Resonance Imaging

  • John Nyenhuis
  • Joe Bourland
  • Gabriel Mouchawar
  • Leslie Geddes
  • Kirk Foster
  • Jim Jones
  • William Schoenlein
  • George Graber
  • Tarek Elabbady
  • D. Joseph Schaefer
  • Mark Riehl

Abstract

Our group at Purdue University has been studying the physiological effects of pulsed magnetic fields for several years. The initial work was directed toward cardiac pacing with a pulsed magnetic field. Our motivation was the development of a non-invasive and relatively pain-free method for cardiac stimulation. We were the first to induce cardiac ectopic beats with pulsed magnetic fields in the closed-chest dog [1,2]. Unfortunately, the large energies required to stimulate the heart preclude the development of a portable magnetic cardiac pacemaker.

Keywords

Magnetic Stimulation Pulse Magnetic Field Gradient Coil Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Stimulation Threshold 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Nyenhuis
    • 1
  • Joe Bourland
    • 1
  • Gabriel Mouchawar
    • 1
  • Leslie Geddes
    • 1
  • Kirk Foster
    • 1
  • Jim Jones
    • 1
  • William Schoenlein
    • 1
  • George Graber
    • 1
  • Tarek Elabbady
    • 1
  • D. Joseph Schaefer
    • 2
  • Mark Riehl
    • 2
  1. 1.Hillenbrand Biomedical Engineering CenterPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA
  2. 2.General Electric Medical SystemsWaukeshaUSA

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