Commercial Application of Adventitious Rooting to Forestry

  • Gary A. Ritchie
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 62)

Abstract

Zhu Xi’s lyrical and evocative lines were penned over 800 years ago. The cuttings referred to are of the Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata [Lamb.] Hook.), China’s major timber producing conifer. A scrutiny of ancient Chinese literature led Li (1992a) to conclude that this species has been propagated by cuttings in China for over 1,000 years. Interestingly, the propagation techniques used today in China have changed little from those of ancient times.

Keywords

Genetic Gain Vegetative Propagation Seed Orchard Hybrid Poplar Rooted Cutting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary A. Ritchie
    • 1
  1. 1.G. R. Staebler Forest Resources Research CenterWeyerhaeuser CompanyCentraliaUSA

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