Metabolism of Aflatoxin B1 by Human Hepatocytes in Primary Culture

  • S. Langouet
  • B. Coles
  • F. Morel
  • K. Maheo
  • B. Ketterer
  • A. Guillouzo
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 387)

Abstract

Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a potent liver carcinogen in the rat (Garner et al 1972) and, with hepatitis B infections, a co-carcinogen in human hepatocellular carcinoma (Qian et al 1994). It is metabolized by cytochrome P450 isoenzymes to give a number of products including AFM1, AFP1 and AFQ1 and the exo-and endo-8,9AFB1 oxides (AFBOs), of which exo-AFBO is the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite (Busby & Wogan 1984; Raney et al 1992a).

Keywords

Human Hepatocyte Cytochrome P450 Isoenzyme Human Glutathione Primary Human Hepatocyte Culture Human Adult Hepatocyte 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Langouet
    • 1
  • B. Coles
    • 2
  • F. Morel
    • 1
  • K. Maheo
    • 1
  • B. Ketterer
    • 2
  • A. Guillouzo
    • 1
  1. 1.INSERM U49 Hopital PontchaillouRENNES CedexFrance
  2. 2.Department of Biochemistry and Molecular BiologyUCLLondonUK

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