Advertisement

Energy Stress in Relation to Germinability and Virulence of Root Infecting Fungi

  • M. Hyakumachi
  • K. Kageyama
  • H. Ikegami
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 230)

Abstract

A potentially important aspect of the survival of fungal propagules in soil is the effect of microbial (energy) stress on propagule vigor. The more rapidly propagule reserves are depleted by exudation and respiration during incubation in soil, the greater their debilitation would be expected to be. The stress imposed by the activity of soil microorganisms has been shown to result in accelerated nutrient deprivation, which may lead to decreased germinability (Adams et al., 1968; Bristow and Lockwood, 1975; Filonow and Lockwood, 1983; Hsu and Lockwood, 1973; Ko and Lockwood, 1967), attenuated virulence (Arora et al., 1985; Filonow et al., 1983), and death (Bristow and Lockwood, 1975).

Keywords

Matric Potential Potato Dextrose Broth Energy Stress Root Infect Fusarium Solani 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. Adams, P. B., Lewis, J. A., and Papavizas, G. C., 1968, Survival of root-infecting fungi in soil. IV. The nature of fungistasis in natural soil and cellulose-amended soil on chlamydospores of Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli, Phytopathology 58: 378.Google Scholar
  2. Arora, D. K., Filonow, A. B., and Lockwood, J. L., 1985, Decreased aggressiveness of Bipolaris sorokiniana conidia in response to nutrient stress, Physiol. Plant Pathol. 26: 135.Google Scholar
  3. Bristow, P. R., and Lockwood, J. L., 1975, Soil Fungistasis: Role of spore exudates in the inhibition of nutrient-independent propagules, J. Gen. Microbiol. 90: 170.Google Scholar
  4. Filonow, A. B., Akueshi, C. O., and Lockwood, J. L., 1983, Decreased virulence of Cochliobolus victoriae conidia after incubation on soils or on leached sand, Phytopathology 73: 1632.Google Scholar
  5. Filonow, A. B., and Lockwood, J. L., 1983, Loss of nutrient-independence for germination by fungal propagules incubated on soils or on a model system imposing diffusive stress, Soil Biol. Biochem. 15: 567.Google Scholar
  6. Hsu, S. C., and Lockwood, J. L., 1973, Soil fungistasis: Behaviour of nutrient-independent spores and sclerotia in a model system, Phytopathology 63: 334.Google Scholar
  7. Hyakumachi, M., Löffler, H. J. M., and Lockwood, J. L., 1989, Methods for determination of carbon loss from fungal propagules incubated in soil, Soil Biol. Biochem. 21: 567.Google Scholar
  8. Ko, W. H., and Lockwood, J. L., 1967, Soil fungistasis: Relation to fungal spore nutrition, Phytopathology 57: 894.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Hyakumachi
    • 1
  • K. Kageyama
    • 1
  • H. Ikegami
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of AgricultureGifu UniversityGifuJapan

Personalised recommendations