Trichoderma Species Against Gummosis Disease in Lemon Trees

  • M. Bicici
  • Y. Dede
  • A. Çinar
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 230)

Abstract

Phytophthora citrophthora (Smith and Smith) Leon. causes gummosis, foot and collar rot of trees, and brown rot of fruits in citrus areas in Turkey. Gummosis is very frequent especially in all citrus growing areas, and is the most important disease of lemon besides mal secco. Gummosis mainly affects the bark of trunks, and the main symptom is the formation of dark colored gum on the surface of the bark and cambium. The decayed bark shrinks, cracks and shreds as it dries out, and gum exudes from the cracks. Callus tissues are often developed in the bark to restrict further spread. The extent of lesions depends on the citrus species and on climatic conditions. In extreme cases, the tree is killed. The causal agent also infects fruit, resulting in a firm, light brown decay. Fruits near the ground become infected when splashed with the soil containing zoospores of the fungus. The pathogen attacks the plants under special cultural conditions, particularly during frequent heavy irrigations or prolonged periods of rainy weather.

Keywords

Wheat Bran Rhizoctonia Solani Trichoderma Harzianum Antagonist Treatment Trichoderma Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. Domsch, K. H., Gams, W., and Anderson, T., 1980, Compendium of Soil Fungi, Vol. I., Academic Press, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Elad, Y., Chet, I., and Katan, J., 1980, Trichoderma harzianum: A biocontrol agent effective against Sclerotium rolfsii and Rhizoctonia solani, Phytopathology, 70: 119.Google Scholar
  3. Gear, A., 1984, Trichoderma Newsletter. No. 1, H.D. Research Association, Essex.Google Scholar
  4. Gear, A., 1985, Trichoderma Newsletter. No. 2, H. D. Research Association, Essex.Google Scholar
  5. Gear, A., 1986, Trichoderma Newsletter. No. 3, H. D. Research Association, Essex.Google Scholar
  6. Gear, A., 1988, Trichoderma Newsletter. No. 4, H. D. Research Association, Essex.Google Scholar
  7. Papavizas, G. C., 1985, Trichoderma and Gliocladium: Biology, ecology, potential for biocontrol, Annu. Rev. Phytopathol., 23: 23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Bicici
    • 1
  • Y. Dede
    • 1
  • A. Çinar
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of Agriculture Plant Protection DepartmentUniversity of ÇukurovaAdanaTurkey

Personalised recommendations