Physiological Perception

The Key to Peak Performance in Athletic Competition
  • Wesley E. Sime

Abstract

Peak performance in competitive athletics that yields a world record or a championship win always involves a multitude of contributing factors. The cornerstone of success is some inherited natural talent and appropriate channeling of the athlete into his/her best sport or event based upon somatotype (muscle fiber type) and/or other physical characteristics. Unfortunately, chance selection and personal preference at a very early age often determine the selection or event, whereas more scientific prediction techniques might yield a better fit between athlete and sport. Fortunately, in the absence of such arbitrary channeling strategies (as seen in many Eastern European countries), many successful athletes reach their ultimate goal in the right sport by a trial-and-error process that involves personal satisfaction, early success in age-group youth sports, and finally the availability of facilities and competent coaching.

Keywords

Blood Lactate Stride Length Anaerobic Threshold Muscle Soreness Stride Frequency 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wesley E. Sime
    • 1
  1. 1.Stress Physiology Laboratory, School of Health, Physical Education and RecreationUniversity of NebraskaLincolnUSA

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