Immunological Characterization of Fungal Enzymes and Biological Chelators Involved in Lignocellulose Degradation

  • Barry Goodell
  • Jody Jellison
Part of the Biodeterioration Research book series (BIOR, volume 3)

Abstract

Understanding the basic mechanisms underlying wood decay is currently of interest because of the need for decay prevention in in-service wooden structures. Additional interest stems from the potential use of biological processes to modify or alter wood, and thereby produce useful chemicals, fuels, pulp, or other materials. Although cellulose and lignin (the basic components of wood) are the two most abundant organic materials on earth, still little is known about the mechanisms involved in their degradation. It has long been postulated that enzymes are involved in the decay process, but the first ligninase from a white-rot fungus was isolated for characterization only as recently as 1983 (Tien and Kirk). More attention has been focused on this field in the last six years but still little is known about enzymes and other metabolites from wood degrading fungi. This is particularly true with regard to how, and if, both cellulose and lignin destroying enzymes penetrate into the wood substance to cause degradation.

Keywords

Electron Spin Resonance Lignin Peroxidase Middle Lamella Phanerochaete Chrysosporium Cellulose Degradation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barry Goodell
    • 1
  • Jody Jellison
    • 2
  1. 1.Wood Science and TechnologyUniversity of MaineOronoUSA
  2. 2.Department of Forest BiologyUniversity of MaineOronoUSA

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